MicroATX Home Server Build– Part 4

After a longish break, here’s the next installment! So the server has been in production now since last September, and is running very well. After the previous post, this is what’s happened:

  • Installed ESXi 6.0 update 1 + some post u1 patches
  • Installed three VMs: Openbsd 5.8 PF router/firewall machine, Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview to run Veeam 9 on and an Ubuntu PXE server to test out PXE deployment
  • Added a 4 port gigabit NIC that I got second hand

In this post, I’ll be writing mostly about ESXi 6.0 and how I’ve configured various things in there.

For the hypervisor, I bought a super small USB memory, specifically a Verbatim Store n’ Stay (I believe this is the model name) 8GB, which looks like a small Bluetooth dongle. It’s about as small as they get. Here’s a picture of it plugged in:

The Verbatim Store N Go plugged in
The Verbatim Store N Go plugged in

Using another USB stick created with Rufus, which had the ESXi 6u1 installation media on it, I installed ESXi on the Verbatim. Nothing worth mentioning here. Post-installation, I turned on ESXi Shell and SSH, because I like having that local console and SSH access for multiple reasons, one of them I’ll get to shortly (hint: it’s about updating).

Since I didn’t want to use the Realtek NIC on the motherboard to do anything, I used one of the ports on the 4 port card for the VMkernel management port. One of the ports I configured as internal and one as external. The external port is hooked up straight to my cable modem, and it will be passed through straight to the OpenBSD virtual machine, so it can get an address from the service provider. The cable modem is configured as a bridge.

The basic network connections therefore look like this:

Simple graph of my home network
Simple graph of my home network

After the installation, multiple ESXi patches have been released. Those can be found under my.vmware.com, using this link: https://my.vmware.com/group/vmware/patch#search. Patches for ESXi can be installed in two ways: either through vCenter  Update Manager (VUM) or by hand over ssh/local esxi shell. Since I will not be running vCenter Server, VUM is out of the question. Installing patches manually requires you to have a datastore on the ESXi server where you can store the patch while you are installing. The files are .zip files (you don’t decompress them before installation), and are usually a few hundred megabytes in size.

To install a patch, I uploaded the zip file to my datastore (in this case the 2TB internal SATA drive) and through SSH logged on to the host. From there, you just run: esxcli software vib install -d /vmfs/volumes/volumename/patchname.zip

Patches most often require reboots so prepare for one, but you don’t have to do it right away.

Update 2 installed on a standalone ESXi host through SSH
Update 2 installed on a standalone ESXi host through SSH

Edit: As I’m writing this, I noticed Update 2 has been released. I’ll have to install that shortly..  Here’s the KB for Update 2 http://kb.vmware.com/kb/2142184

A one-host environment is hardly a configuration challenge, but some of the stuff that I’ve set up includes:

  • Don’t display a warning about SSH being on (this is under Configuration -> Advanced Settings -> UserVars -> UserVars.SuppressShellWarning “1”)
  • Set hostnames, DNS, etc. under Configuration -> DNS and Routing (also made sure that the ESXi host has a proper dns A record and PTR, too; things just work better this way)
  • Set NTP server to something proper under Configuration -> Time Configuration

For the network, nothing complicated was done as mentioned earlier. The management interface is on vmnic0, vswitch 0. It has a vmkernel port which has the management ip address. You can easily share management and virtual machine networking if you want to, though that’s not a best practice. In that scenario, you would create a port group under the same vswitch, and call it something like Virtual Machine port group for instance. That port group doesn’t get an IP, it’s just a network location you can refer to when you are assigning networking for your VMs. What ever settings are on the physical port / vswitch / port group apply to VMs that have been assigned to that port group.

By the way, after the install of Update 2, I noticed something cool on the ESXi host web page:

Host..client?
VMware Host..client?

Hold on, this looks very familiar to the vSphere web client which has been available for vCenter since 5.1?

Very familiar!
Very familiar!

Very familiar in fact! This looks awesome! Looks like yet another piece that VMware needs to kill of the vSphere Client. Not sure I’m ready to give it up just yet, but the lack of a tool to configure a stand-alone host was one of the key pieces missing so far.

Host web client after login
Host web client after login

In the next  post I will be looking at my VMs and how I use them in my environment.

Relevant links:

https://rufus.akeo.ie/
http://www.verbatim.com/prod/flash-memory/usb-drives/everyday-usb-drives/netbook-usb-drive-sku-97463/
The Host UI web client was previously a Fling, something you could install but that wasn’t released with ESXi https://labs.vmware.com/flings/esxi-embedded-host-client
But now it’s official: http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vsphere/60/vsphere-esxi-60u2-release-notes.html